Corey Davis, J.D., M.S.P.H., is deputy director of the Network’s Southeastern Region Office and  Director of the Harm Reduction Legal Project. Corey was previously a Senior Attorney at the National Health Law Program (NHeLP), where he helped to advance access to quality health care for low-income and underserved individuals. Before joining NHeLP Corey served as Employment Rights Attorney at Equality Advocates Pennsylvania, where he represented lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals before administrative commissions and in state and federal courts. He previously oversaw a street-based legal clinic sited at Philadelphia’s syringe exchange program.

Corey has served as chair of a county board of health, chair of the board of the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition, and vice-chair of the North Carolina Harm Public Health Foundation, among other positions. He is a recipient of the International AIDS Society’s Young Investigator Award andhas published extensively in the lay and academic press. Corey received his B.S. from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, his M.S.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his J.D. from Temple University. Corey is barred in Pennsylvania and New Jersey as well as various federal courts.

View a collection of research, resources and trainings produced by Corey below.

Articles & Resources

Tennessee’s Naloxone Access Law, Explained

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionTennessee

August 4, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

In 2021 drug overdose claimed the lives of nearly 108,000 people, and either by themselves or in combination with other drugs or alcohol, opioids were responsible for approximately 75 percent of these deaths. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with the administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone and, where needed, other emergency care. This fact sheet outlines modifications and other changes to laws in Tennessee to increase access to naloxone, including removal of some confusing language that previously limited the impact of state efforts to increase access to lifesaving opioid antagonist medications.

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Legality of Dispensing Naloxone to Minors in California

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionCalifornia

July 14, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

There are many reasons a person under the age of 18 may wish to obtain the life-saving overdose reversal medication naloxone or another opioid antagonist. Substance use disorders often develop in adolescence, and around 10 percent of overdoses nationally occur in youth and young adults below 26 years old.  In 2020, over 15 percent (874 out of 5,502) overdose deaths in California occurred in individuals under the age of 25.  Additionally, individuals under the age of 18 may be able to intervene in the overdose of an adult, such as a friend or family member. This fact sheet examines the legality of dispensing naloxone to minors in California.

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Legality of Expired Naloxone in Tennessee

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionTennessee

July 14, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

All 50 states and the District of Columbia have modified their laws to increase access to naloxone, the standard first-line treatment for opioid overdose. While these laws have been successful in increasing access to this lifesaving medication, few explicitly address the legality of distributing and administering naloxone that is past its expiration date. This fact sheet discusses whether Tennessee laws forbid the prescription, dispensing, distribution, possession, or administration of expired naloxone and whether medical professionals and others who take such actions might be held liable.  

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Legality of Drug Checking Equipment in Illinois

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectMechanisms for Advancing Public Health

June 1, 2022
by Corey Davis

In 2021, nearly two thirds of overdose deaths in the U.S. involved a synthetic opioid, most commonly fentanyl. Fentanyl is more potent than many other opioids and because it’s difficult for people who use heroin and other street opioids to know or control the amount of fentanyl present in an opioid, they are at a heightened risk for overdose. Because no safe supply of many drugs is readily available, helping people who use drugs determine what is in those drugs can reduce overdose morbidity and mortality. This fact sheet examines the legality of distributing drug checking equipment in Illinois, equipment that can provide detailed analysis of the substances present in a drug sample.

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Legality of Dispensing and Administering Expired Naloxone in Texas

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionTexas

April 21, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

In response to the ongoing opioid overdose crisis, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have modified their laws to increase access to naloxone, the standard first-line treatment for opioid overdose. While these laws have been successful in increasing access to this lifesaving medication, few explicitly address the legality of distributing and administering naloxone that is past its expiration date. These fact sheets discuss the efficacy of expired naloxone in Kentucky and Texas and whether the relative laws in each state permit the distribution and administration of such naloxone.

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Legality of Dispensing and Administering Expired Naloxone in Kentucky

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionKentucky

April 21, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

In response to the ongoing opioid overdose crisis, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have modified their laws to increase access to naloxone, the standard first-line treatment for opioid overdose. While these laws have been successful in increasing access to this lifesaving medication, few explicitly address the legality of distributing and administering naloxone that is past its expiration date. These fact sheets discuss the efficacy of expired naloxone in Kentucky and Texas and whether the relative laws in each state permit the distribution and administration of such naloxone.

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The Network for Public Health Law’s Harm Reduction Legal Project Receives Renewed Funding from Arnold Ventures

Network NewsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesSubstance Use Prevention and Harm ReductionOpioid Misuse and Overdose Prevention

February 16, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

Arnold Ventures has renewed funding support for the Network for Public Health Law’s Harm Reduction Legal Project, which works to address the legal and policy barriers that impede the establishment and expansion of evidence-based harm reduction measures such as naloxone distribution, syringe access programs, and access to evidence-based substance use disorder treatment.

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