Corey Davis, J.D., M.S.P.H., is deputy director of the Network’s Southeastern Region Office and the Director of the Harm Reduction Legal Project. Before joining NHeLP Corey served as Employment Rights Attorney at Equality Advocates Pennsylvania where he represented lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals before administrative commissions and in state and federal courts. Prior to joining Equality Advocates, Corey oversaw a street-based legal clinic sited at Philadelphia’s syringe exchange program. In both of these positions he provided direct legal representation as well as education, outreach and strategic advocacy.

Corey has also worked for the North Carolina Institute of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania and the Drug Control and Access to Medicines Consortium in both research and management capacities. He is the recipient of the International AIDS Society’s Young Investigator Award, given for empirical research on the effect of law and law enforcement practice on access to an evidence-based public health intervention, and has published in the lay and academic press. Corey received his B.S. from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, his M.S.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his J.D. from Temple University. Corey is barred in Pennsylvania and New Jersey as well as various federal courts.
View a collection of research, resources and trainings produced by Corey below.

Articles & Resources

A Decade of Both Progress and Missed Opportunities to Reduce Drug-Related Harm

Law & Policy InsightsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

June 16, 2021
by Corey Davis

Over the past ten years, there have been important and lifesaving efforts to address drug related harm. All states have passed laws increasing access to the overdose reversal medication naloxone and nearly all have passed overdose Good Samaritan laws, and dedicated advocates have succeeded in legalizing syringe services programs in several states. Unfortunately, law still overwhelmingly works to increase, rather than decrease, risks to people who use drugs. In this commentary, Corey Davis, director of the Network’s Harm Reduction Legal Project, reflects on efforts to address the opioid epidemic and why additional systemic change is needed. Read more.

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Equitable Rebuilding from COVID-19: Ensuring Quality Care for Vulnerable Populations

WebinarsCOVID-19COVID-19 and Health EquityMental Health and Well-BeingOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionTelehealth

May 11, 2021
by Amy Lieberman, Corey Davis and Jill Krueger

In this webinar, presenters will describe the nature of the laws being announced from the judicial bench or proposed in state legislatures, the process by which they are being formulated in every level and branch of government, and the principles that should guide legal developments as we seek to balance the facts, expert opinion, and civic participation, as well as guard against harmful unforeseen consequences.

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Access to Treatment for Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder

GuidanceHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose Prevention

April 21, 2021
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

The Network has joined with public health law partners to produce a new report, COVID-19 Policy Playbook: Legal Recommendations for a Safer, More Equitable Future, examining policy challenges and opportunities in light of the pandemic. In this Q&A, the Network’s Corey Davis and Amy Lieberman discuss some of the key elements in the chapter they co-authored for the report including the positive impact of opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment, recent changes to increase access to that treatment, and recommendations for permanently reducing legislative and regulatory barriers to effective, evidence-based interventions for OUD.

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American Rescue Plan Act Provides Opportunity for Syringe Access

Law & Policy InsightsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

March 30, 2021
by Corey Davis

President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARPA) into law on March 11, 2021. While most media attention focused on its headline provisions, including $1,400 stimulus checks for many individuals, $350 billion in aid to state, local, and tribal governments, and expansions in the Earned Income Tax Credit and child tax credit, the Act also contains historic assistance for harm reduction programs.

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Ensuring Access to Clean Needles Can Save Lives, but Legal Barriers Persist

Law & Policy InsightsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

February 5, 2021
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

The United States continues to experience an unprecedented level of drug-related harm. While the failure to prevent this harm is most notable in the number of overdose deaths, which are now at their highest level on record, it is evident in other areas as well. Of particular importance from a policy perspective, bloodborne disease infections related to syringe sharing are also on the rise, with recent outbreaks in Kentucky, Massachusetts, and Indiana, among other states. Cases of infective endocarditis, which is caused largely by unsafe injection, are increasing as well.

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Determining Whether Federal Law Prohibits the Mailing of Naloxone

Law & Policy InsightsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

December 3, 2020
by Corey Davis

The Network’s Harm Reduction Legal Project works to address the legal and policy barriers that impede the establishment and expansion of evidence-based harm reduction measures such as naloxone distribution, syringe access programs, and access to evidence-based substance use disorder treatment. One of the questions frequently received by the Project is whether federal law prohibits harm reduction organizations and similar groups who are authorized to distribute naloxone from mailing the medication.

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