Corey Davis, J.D., M.S.P.H., is deputy director of the Network’s Southeastern Region Office and  Director of the Harm Reduction Legal Project. Corey was previously a Senior Attorney at the National Health Law Program (NHeLP), where he helped to advance access to quality health care for low-income and underserved individuals. Before joining NHeLP Corey served as Employment Rights Attorney at Equality Advocates Pennsylvania, where he represented lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals before administrative commissions and in state and federal courts. He previously oversaw a street-based legal clinic sited at Philadelphia’s syringe exchange program.

Corey has served as chair of a county board of health, chair of the board of the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition, and vice-chair of the North Carolina Harm Public Health Foundation, among other positions. He is a recipient of the International AIDS Society’s Young Investigator Award andhas published extensively in the lay and academic press. Corey received his B.S. from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, his M.S.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his J.D. from Temple University. Corey is barred in Pennsylvania and New Jersey as well as various federal courts.

View a collection of research, resources and trainings produced by Corey below.

Articles & Resources

Legality of Dispensing and Administering Expired Naloxone in Texas

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionTexas

April 21, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

In response to the ongoing opioid overdose crisis, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have modified their laws to increase access to naloxone, the standard first-line treatment for opioid overdose. While these laws have been successful in increasing access to this lifesaving medication, few explicitly address the legality of distributing and administering naloxone that is past its expiration date. These fact sheets discuss the efficacy of expired naloxone in Kentucky and Texas and whether the relative laws in each state permit the distribution and administration of such naloxone.

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Legality of Dispensing and Administering Expired Naloxone in Kentucky

Fact SheetHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionKentucky

April 21, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

In response to the ongoing opioid overdose crisis, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have modified their laws to increase access to naloxone, the standard first-line treatment for opioid overdose. While these laws have been successful in increasing access to this lifesaving medication, few explicitly address the legality of distributing and administering naloxone that is past its expiration date. These fact sheets discuss the efficacy of expired naloxone in Kentucky and Texas and whether the relative laws in each state permit the distribution and administration of such naloxone.

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The Network for Public Health Law’s Harm Reduction Legal Project Receives Renewed Funding from Arnold Ventures

Network NewsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesSubstance Use Prevention and Harm ReductionOpioid Misuse and Overdose Prevention

February 16, 2022
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

Arnold Ventures has renewed funding support for the Network for Public Health Law’s Harm Reduction Legal Project, which works to address the legal and policy barriers that impede the establishment and expansion of evidence-based harm reduction measures such as naloxone distribution, syringe access programs, and access to evidence-based substance use disorder treatment.

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Dual Epidemics of COVID-19 and Overdose Highlight Impact of Structural Racism

Law & Policy InsightsCOVID-19Opioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionRacism as a Public Health Crisis

October 20, 2021
by Corey Davis

The United States remains in the grip of both COVID-19 and drug-related harm. Both are public health emergencies marked by tens of thousands of preventable deaths – and both disproportionately impact Black, Hispanic, Native, and other non-White people. Addressing the structural racism that drive inequality in access to economic opportunity, educational attainment, and other factors that ultimately drives health disparities must be a key public health priority – both during the dual COVID and overdose epidemics and beyond.  

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Recent Federal Policy Changes Improve Buprenorphine Access, but X-Waiver Remains a Barrier for Opioid Use Disorder Treatment

Law & Policy InsightsHarm Reduction Legal ProjectOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

October 20, 2021
by Corey Davis

The medications for opioid use disorder, methadone and buprenorphine, can reduce overdose deaths by over 50 percent. Unfortunately, many people who want to access these medications are unable to do so  because of federal and state legal restrictions, primarily the federal X-waiver, which a physician must obtain in order to prescribe these medications. While the requirement itself is statutory and can only be changed by Congress, the departments of Justice and Health and Human Services (HHS)  have a great deal of autonomy in determining its exact contours.

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Substance Use Disorder (SUD)-Related Emergency Department Mandates

50-state surveyHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose Prevention

October 19, 2021
by Corey Davis

We conducted a systematic legal review to determine the prevalence and characteristics of state laws that require some or all hospital emergency departments to create protocols to screen patients for substance use disorder as well as those that require that hospitals take specific actions when providing care to such individuals or individuals who have experienced an overdose.

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