Corey Davis, J.D., M.S.P.H., is deputy director of the Network’s Southeastern Region Office and the Director of the Harm Reduction Legal Project. Before joining NHeLP Corey served as Employment Rights Attorney at Equality Advocates Pennsylvania where he represented lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals before administrative commissions and in state and federal courts. Prior to joining Equality Advocates, Corey oversaw a street-based legal clinic sited at Philadelphia’s syringe exchange program. In both of these positions he provided direct legal representation as well as education, outreach and strategic advocacy.

Corey has also worked for the North Carolina Institute of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania and the Drug Control and Access to Medicines Consortium in both research and management capacities. He is the recipient of the International AIDS Society’s Young Investigator Award, given for empirical research on the effect of law and law enforcement practice on access to an evidence-based public health intervention, and has published in the lay and academic press. Corey received his B.S. from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, his M.S.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his J.D. from Temple University. Corey is barred in Pennsylvania and New Jersey as well as various federal courts.
View a collection of research, resources and trainings produced by Corey below.

Articles & Resources

Naloxone Prescription Mandates

Fact SheetCOVID-19Harm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

October 22, 2020
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

Drug overdose continues to claim the lives of tens of thousands of people in the U.S. every year. Opioids, both prescription painkillers and street drugs such as heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, are responsible for the majority of these deaths. In response, states have passed legislation to increase access to the opioid overdose reversal medication naloxone, including provisions that allow for the distribution of naloxone through pharmacies. Some states have gone further and now require that naloxone be prescribed or offered to some patients. This fact sheet describes those requirements and links to the relevant laws.

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Q&A: Access to Care for Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder

Law & Policy InsightsCOVID-19Harm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

October 6, 2020
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

In this Q&A, Corey Davis, deputy director of the Network’s Southeastern Region Office and director of the Network’s Harm Reduction Legal Project; and Amy Lieberman, senior attorney, for the Network’s Harm Reduction Legal Project, discuss some of the key elements in the chapter they authored, Access to Care for Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder, for the Report.

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Characteristics of Statewide Naloxone Distribution Mechanisms

50-state surveyOpioid Misuse and Overdose PreventionHarm Reduction Legal ProjectHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesSubstance Use Prevention and Harm Reduction

August 7, 2020
by Corey Davis

This fact sheet provides information on Pennsylvania's Act 139, which provides limited immunity to overdose victims and bystanders that seek medical help, and increases accesss to naloxone, a drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

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Legality of Dispensing and Administering Expired Naloxone in Georgia

Fact SheetSubstance Use Prevention and Harm ReductionHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesHarm Reduction Legal ProjectOpioid Misuse and Overdose Prevention

June 4, 2020
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

While states have passed various laws designed to increase access to naloxone, a life-saving opioid overdose reversal medication, none explicitly address the legality of dispensing naloxone that is past its expiration date. This fact sheet discusses whether Georgia laws forbid the prescription, dispensing, distribution, possession, or administration of expired naloxone and whether such actions impact the risk of civil liability for medical professionals who prescribe or dispense naloxone or laypeople who distribute or administer it.

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Legality of Dispensing and Administering Expired Naloxone in the District of Columbia

Fact SheetSubstance Use Prevention and Harm ReductionHarm Reduction Legal Project ResourcesHarm Reduction Legal ProjectOpioid Misuse and Overdose Prevention

May 21, 2020
by Amy Lieberman and Corey Davis

This fact sheet discusses whether District of Columbia laws forbid the prescription, dispensing, distribution, possession, or administration of expired naloxone and whether such actions impact the risk of civil liability for medical professionals who prescribe or dispense naloxone or laypeople who distribute or administer it.

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Drug Enforcement Administration Waives Some Barriers to Medications for Opioid Use Disorder in Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

Law & Policy InsightsCOVID-19Harm Reduction Legal ProjectSubstance Use Prevention and Harm ReductionHealth and Health Care

May 20, 2020
by Corey Davis

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has temporarily waived or clarified several regulations that may act as barriers to providing life-saving medications to those undergoing treatment for opioid use disorder during the COVID-19 Pandemic. These changes have the potential to dramatically increase access to these medication and the DEA should strongly consider extending many of these changes for the duration of the opioid public health emergency, which will remain even after the threat from COVID-19 subsides.

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COVID-19 Pandemic Prompts Federal Agencies to Reduce Restrictions on Medications for Opioid Use Disorder

Law & Policy InsightsCOVID-19Substance Use Prevention and Harm ReductionHarm Reduction Legal ProjectTelehealth

March 21, 2020
by Corey Davis

The medications methadone and buprenorphine are extremely effective in reducing the harms associated with opioid use disorder. In light of the ongoing public health emergency associated with COVID-19 the federal government has recently taken a number of steps to increase access to these lifesaving medications.

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